bloggie

friday, august 1, 2014 9:29 pm zst

I am Greek and I cannot keep calm

hyperlinkopotamus

zorkmidden left a comment at 8:41 pm 08/01
evariste @ large is also here
franco cbi left a comment at 5:11 pm 07/31
zorkmidden is also here
evariste @ large left a comment at 10:21 pm 07/28
zorkmidden left a comment at 1:45 pm 07/28
packen and franco cbi have also commented
packen left a comment at 3:35 pm 07/28
zorkmidden and franco cbi have also commented
zorkmidden left a comment at 6:35 pm 07/22
Thousand Sons and evariste have also commented
franco cbi left a comment at 10:15 am 07/21
evariste is also here
zorkmidden left a comment at 8:33 pm 07/16
packen and franco cbi have also commented
packen left a comment at 6:08 pm 07/06
franco cbi and evariste have also commented
Posted by franco cbi on Feb 25, 2013 7:23 am

2 comments, latest by franco cbi at 9:08 am 2/25

#1 franco cbi at 7:27 am on Feb 25, 2013

Garry Wills wants us to know that he really bears no animus toward priests. Truly. Some of his best friends, not to mention his mentors, are priests. His quarrel is not with priests but with the specious notion of the priesthood, which, he argues, finds no precedent in the early church and precious little warrant in the New Testament.

Jesus never claimed for himself the mantle of priesthood, nor did he, a Jew, hail from the priestly tribe of Levi. The sole reference to Jesus as priest in the New Testament, Wills says, occurs in the Epistle to the Hebrews, an enigmatic letter of unknown provenance. The writer of the letter introduces the notion of Jesus as priest not in the line of Aaron (Levite) but in the tradition of Melchizedek, the obscure Canaanite king of Salem who makes a cameo appearance in Genesis and is mentioned again briefly in Psalm 110.

Using his linguistic skills and his impressive command of both secondary literature and patristic sources, Wills raises doubts aplenty about “the Melchizedek myth,” and the priestly claims for Jesus in the “idiosyncratic” Epistle to the Hebrews. He notes as well the linguistic anomalies of the Genesis passage and even questions the inclusion of Hebrews in the canon of Scripture.

#2 franco cbi at 9:08 am on Feb 25, 2013

The Melchizedek story in Genesis 14 is rather odd. The character appears abruptly, with no connection to the previous chapters, and is then never seen again in the Bible. The style of that chapter is completely different than the other three sources that have been identified for the first four books of the Bible.

recent comments

[img]
He did a voice acting gig for this video game "Destiny" and it is very hilarious how few fucks he
[img]
Dang. I thought for sure this was going to be by Borowitz or the Daily Currant.
Homophones: Turning Straight People Gay for Over A Hundred Years.
' After publishing a blog post about homophones, Torkildson was fired by his boss, Nomen owner Clarke Woodger, in
' The images and metaphors keep doing headstands. To “bail out” is to slop water over the side of
[ #6 ]/ zorkmidden: Especially with an umlaut--Fürpig. Gives it more umph.
[ #4 ]/ franco cbi ' Given that he's named after a Truffle, "pig" is
[ #3 ]/ packen: That's fantastic! I'm so glad!
[ #1 ]/ packen: Me too. And I miss it so, I hate being forced to drive to get
[ #3 ]/ franco cbi: LOL, too me a moment.
William Howard Kuntsler, a critic of modern cities who has written several articles for _ The Atlantic _ , notes
[img] Sneaky spammer!
In Washington DC the only areas that come close to this ideal are Georgetown and Old Town Alexandria, and even
Given that he's named after a Truffle, "pig" is appropriate. :) Congratulations on your loss of weight, Packen!
zorkie, thank you so much for inspiring me. I can now fit into clothes I haven't worn in years and
Great article. I can so relate to it growing up in a traditional city.
I have two Deutsche Pelzig Faul Schweinhundinnen.
Furpig is Tartuffo's new name now.
And by that, I don't mean "exposing" it. I mean not-so-subtly _ endorsing _ it.
[ #25 ]/ common help Lulli I searched you onfb and could not reach you
[ #2 ]/ Thousand Sons: I loved that book!
I've wanted to see Sana'a ever since I read 'Motoring with Mohammed' years ago.
The turban makes me think of [ _ The Streets Of Cairo _ ]/ (skip to 10:03-13).

home

this & that

bloggie pulse: circulation
last 15 minutes:
31
last hour:
61
last 24 hours:
706
bloggie pulse: comments
since midnite:
2
last 24 hours:
2
in our lifetime:
5608