discarded lies: monday, october 20, 2014 3:46 pm zst
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daily archive: 04/12/2006
guest author: evariste in Discarded Lies - Hyperlinkopotamus:
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guest author: evariste in Discarded Lies - Hyperlinkopotamus:
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guest author: evariste in Discarded Lies - Hyperlinkopotamus:
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guest author: evariste in Discarded Lies - Hyperlinkopotamus:
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guest author: Fay in Discarded Lies - Hyperlinkopotamus:
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guest author: marine momma in Discarded Lies - Hyperlinkopotamus:
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guest author: marine momma in Discarded Lies - Hyperlinkopotamus:
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guest author: evariste in Discarded Lies - Hyperlinkopotamus:
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guest author: V the K in Discarded Lies - Hyperlinkopotamus:
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guest author: lady redhawk in Discarded Lies - Hyperlinkopotamus:
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guest author: Lyana in Discarded Lies - Hyperlinkopotamus:
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zorkmidden in Discarded Lies:
'Allah is the greatest'
Jurors in the Zacarias Moussaoui trial heard the recording of Flight 93 today (here's the complete transcript). As I was reading it I realised that five years later the events of that day still feel as shocking and heartbreaking to me as they did back then.
Seven seconds after 10 a.m., in Arabic: "Is that it? Shall we finish it off?"

Another hijacker, also in Arabic: "When they all come, we finish it off."

Six seconds later in English: "I'm injured."

Ten seconds later in English: "In the cockpit. If we don't, we'll die." Followed quickly by a second loud crash of metal, glass and plastic rammed together hard.

The hijacker pilot is pushing the steering yoke forward and back, perhaps to throw the attacking passengers to the floor. The tail sags, sounding the stall alarm. Then the nose comes back down, silencing it.

Then just 123 seconds before the crash, one hijacker asks again in Arabic "Is that it?" A cacophony of new voices joins the shouting over the next two minutes. The plane rolls belly up and noses over, then crashes.
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guest author: luLU in Discarded Lies - Hyperlinkopotamus:
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guest author: luLU in Discarded Lies - Hyperlinkopotamus:
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guest author: marine momma in Discarded Lies - Hyperlinkopotamus:
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guest author: RC neo-Jew in Discarded Lies - Hyperlinkopotamus:
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guest author: Thousand Sons in Discarded Lies - Hyperlinkopotamus:
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guest author: Thousand Sons in Discarded Lies - Hyperlinkopotamus:
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evariste in Discarded Lies:
Economy adding better jobs
This will make Democrats sad. The US economy continues to roar along nicely:
The US economy isn't just producing jobs these days, it's also producing good jobs. Alongside the ads for jobs handling a cash register or a spatula are these new opportunities:

• In St. Louis, AFB International is enlisting both technicians, paid $30,000 to $40,000, and PhD scientists, offered $80,000 to $100,000, in its quest for the perfect pet food.

• In Delaware, Honeywell plans to hire people at $40,000 to $100,000 to work in a data-storage center.

• In southern California, some of the latest openings involve working on the railroad, for $35,000 to $70,000 a year. Union Pacific plans to add 2,000 employees altogether.

These reports in the past month symbolize a welcome trend during an economic expansion that at first offered only tepid job gains, both in quantity and quality.

This good news about the breadth of job creation comes against a backdrop of labor-market anxiety that has persisted despite the economy's solid overall footing. Competition from imported goods, the threat of outsourcing services abroad, and a controversial influx of illegal laborers are just some of the forces that make many workers worried about their future.

Creating good jobs - the kinds that can keep American living standards rising - appears likely to remain a challenge. But the current employment picture at least indicates movement in a positive direction.

"We're creating lots of all kinds of jobs, across many industries, occupations, and pay scales," says Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody's Economy.com. But he adds: "If your skill sets are rusty, or at the low end of the skill range, you're going to have a tougher time."

The economy added 211,000 jobs in March, according to a Labor Department report Friday - a solid showing about on par with expectations. The unemployment rate fell a notch, to 4.7 percent.

The new jobs still include plenty at the low end: An analysis by Merrill Lynch finds that some 40 percent of the net gain in March came in two areas known for low pay: retail services and leisure/hospitality, which includes restaurants.

But this is just part of a broader tapestry. Management and professional occupations are employing 1.2 million more people this month than a year ago - or about 1 in 3 new jobs in America. This is the highest-paying of five broad categories tracked by the Labor Department. Not all of them are CEOs or engineers, but the median paycheck for full-time workers in this category is $937 a week, far above the US median of $651.

The construction industry continues to hammer out more than its share of new jobs. It accounts for about 6.4 percent of US jobs, but has provided 14.4 percent of the past year's job growth. The quality of construction jobs is mixed - often offering higher hourly pay than the US median but with lower benefits.

Even the manufacturing sector, which has long offered blue-collar workers a measure of middle-class prosperity, appears to be stabilizing after a period of heavy job losses. Despite downsizing in the automotive industry, 175,000 more people are employed in production occupations today than a year ago.

"As this recovery gets under way, professional services have begun adding jobs fairly broadly," says Jared Bernstein, an economist at the liberal Economic Policy Institute (EPI) in Washington.

EPI tracks the weighting of higher- versus lower-paying jobs that are being added to the economy. For much of the current expansion, which began at the end of 2001, that indicator has been negative.

In the past year, however, it has turned positive, meaning that the new jobs in the economy are the kind that tend to pull average wages up, not down.

Beyond professional services, one example may be construction. The housing market is cooling, but commercial building is heating up.

"More of the work will be in nonresidential construction," predicts Michael Carliner, an economist at the National Association of Home Builders. That could mean demand for higher skills, such as equipment operation, that boost pay.
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guest author: RIP Ford in Discarded Lies - Hyperlinkopotamus:
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guest author: mauro in Discarded Lies - Hyperlinkopotamus:
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guest author: Right Wing Conspirator in Discarded Lies - Hyperlinkopotamus:
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guest author: Right Wing Conspirator in Discarded Lies - Hyperlinkopotamus:
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guest author: סטרמי Stormi سترمي in Discarded Lies - Hyperlinkopotamus:
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guest author: Thousand Sons in Discarded Lies - Hyperlinkopotamus:
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guest author: Lyana in Discarded Lies - Hyperlinkopotamus:
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guest author: Lyana in Discarded Lies - Hyperlinkopotamus:
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guest author: From Zionist Occupied Londonistan in Discarded Lies - Hyperlinkopotamus:
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guest author: solus rex in Discarded Lies - Hyperlinkopotamus:
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evariste in Discarded Lies:
Turkish Islamists make their move on the military
The last bastion of secularism in Turkey is under vicious attack from Islamists, and the military does not seem to be vigorous or excited enough for another coup; they're just as besotted by the European dream as the Islamists are, and the Europeans have made it clear that they're completely opposed to the military's role as the Ataturkism enforcer of last resort.
Despite three military coups in the past decades, the Turkish military is the most respected and trusted institution in the country, as the guardian and guarantor of the legacy of Mustafa Kemal Ataturk - a pro-Western, secular Turkish republic.

But in the view of Turkey's Islamists, a strong and hawkish chief of general staff would pose a threat to their efforts to move Turkey from secularism to Islamism.

Turkish military commander Gen. Mehmet Yasar Buyukanit, an outspoken and tough-on-terrorism anti-Islamist, is expected to become the next chief of general staff in August 2006. Since last year, a campaign has been waged to tarnish Gen. Buyukanit's reputation, in order to block him from this post.

First in this campaign were allegations, spread through various websites, that Gen. Buyukanit was not a "pureblood" Turk, but had Sabbatean Jewish elements in his family tree. It was claimed on these websites that, in accordance with the traditions of Sabbateans, he had wed his daughter to a "certified" Sabbatean. One Islamist website posted a long list of names and citizenship identification numbers of members of Gen. Buyukanit's family tree, to "prove" that he was not a "real" Turk. [1] The site's homepage heading challenged Gen. Buyukanit: "If you have any courage, prove to us that you are not a Jewish donme [i.e. a crypto-Jew; Sabbatean convert to Islam]!" [2]

Then, in early March 2006 came an indictment against him in the matter of the November 9, 2005 bombing of a bookshop in the mainly Kurdish town of Semdinli, owned by a former Kurdish member of the PKK. [3]

The charges against Gen. Buyukanit were prepared by the assistant district attorney for the city of Van, prosecutor Ferhat Sarikaya who in October 2005 had charged and incarcerated Professor Yucel Askin, president of Yuzuncu Yil University (YYU) in Van [4] who was known for stopping the Islamist activities in the university.

The charges against Gen. Buyukanit created a political storm in Turkey. The military called the charges an assault by a certain sect of Islamists on the Turkish Armed Forces (TSK), and hinted that the followers of Turkish Islamist leader Fethullah Gulen [5] and some AKP members were involved.

Subsequently, on March 23, the Turkish media reported on the removal of Turkish Security Directorate intelligence chief Sabri Uzun for statements inferring that the military was behind the Semdinli events. Then, a Justice Ministry investigation of Prosecutor Sarikaya found that the charges against Gen. Buyukanit did not have "the required basis" for prosecution.

The following are excerpts from the Turkish press' coverage of the crisis:

"First the Rector, Now the General"

Columnist Bekir Coskun of the secular mainstream Turkish daily Hurriyet wrote: [6] "The rift is deepening between the [AKP] government and all the concepts and institutions that are defending the secular republic. Now the lines are clearer, the attitudes are stronger, [and] the attacks are more frequent. The religionist [i.e. the Islamist] has abandoned his calm, softer attitude. The game is over. […] 'First the rector, now the general…' Accusations directed at Gen. Yasar Buyukanit - who is expected to become chief of general staff in the coming period - is where we have got to, following the [AKP government's] purge of thousands of secular Ataturk followers from government positions. It seems that the armed forces commanders are next in line."

In an op-ed titled "The Goal is to Wear Gen. Buyukanit Down," columnist Mehmet Y. Yilmaz of Hurriyet wrote: [7] "[…] First they spread lies about the ethnic origins of Gen. Buyukanit's family [alleging Sabbatean/Jewish ancestry]. […] Now on the agenda is the Van prosecutor's charge that 'Buyukanit attempted to influence the judiciary.' They base their accusation on what Gen. Buyukanit said about a soldier allegedly involved in the Semdinli incident: 'I know him, he is a good guy.' The rest of Buyukanit's statement, 'Whether he is guilty or not will be determined by the investigation,' has been omitted for some reason. [...]"

Columnist Meric Koyatasi of the secular, mainstream daily Aksam wrote: [8] "[…] Even if it was not heard directly from the mouth of the government, it is known that circles close to the [AKP] government are trying to block Gen. Buyukanit. […] The prosecutor is famous for his previous indictment of the rector of the university at Van [YYU Professor] Yucel Askin, who had not permitted shari'a [advocates] to organize on campus. […]

"Everybody already knows that certain circles want to peck at and erode our military. These [circles] have worked and organized, secretly and tirelessly, since the [1923] founding of the Republic [of Turkey] [...] Prejudice [in the judiciary] based on ideologies, beliefs, culture, and form of education is very, very dangerous. […]"

In an article titled "Politics Meddle with the Military," columnist Ali Sirmen of the center-left, secular daily Cumhuriyet wrote: [9] "[…] It is well known that in the process of re-shaping Turkey according to its own ideology, the AKP government is targeting the military [...] Gen. Kemal Yavuz once clearly said, 'The military has always been the ultimate target of any government that based its existence on religion.' [...]

"Let me underline some strange coincidences. It is well known that the AKP government is not pleased with universities, especially Yuzuncu Yil University at Van and its rector, Yucel Askin. Therefore, Van prosecutor Ferhat Sarikaya appears onstage and prepares the indictment [against Askin], which was rejected by most legal authorities. […] Everybody also knows that some circles close to AKP feel uncomfortable with [future chief of general staff] Gen. Buyukanit […]. [So, again, prosecutor] Sarikaya prepares a terrible indictment against Buyukanit […]"
There's lots more.
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guest author: papijoe in Discarded Lies - Hyperlinkopotamus:
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guest author: Frank IBC in Discarded Lies - Hyperlinkopotamus:
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guest author: airforcewife in Discarded Lies - Hyperlinkopotamus:
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guest author: RIP Ford in Discarded Lies - Hyperlinkopotamus:
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zorkmidden in Discarded Lies:
Austria: we welcomed Hitler
Heinz Fischer is the first Austrian president to admit that Austrians welcomed Hitler with open arms.
Surveys show that most Austrians continue to deny that 200,000 people welcomed Hitler's troops as they marched into Austria, despite the overwhelming evidence that ecstatic crowds gathered at Heldenplatz in Vienna's city centre to hear him deliver a rousing speech.

The view most commonly held still is that the Anschluss was forced on a reluctant people.

Mr Fischer picked holes in the 1955 declaration of independence which he said had helped establish the false picture of the country's history which still endures.
I can see why Austrians would like to perceive themselves as Hitler's victims, but why did the Allies help promote this lie?
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guest author: WriterMom in Discarded Lies - Hyperlinkopotamus:
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zorkmidden in Discarded Lies:
Black is white and night is day
Jihad does not mean jihad, a suicide bomber who blows himself up in the name of Islam is not an Islamic terrorist, and Islam in itself means peace: EU lexicon to shun term "Islamic terrorism"
EU officials are working on what they call a "lexicon" for public communication on terrorism and Islam, designed to make clear that there is nothing in the religion to justify outrages like the September 11 attacks or the bombings of Madrid and London.

The lexicon would set down guidelines for EU officials and politicians.

"Certainly 'Islamic terrorism' is something we will not use ... we talk about 'terrorists who abusively invoke Islam'," an EU official told Reuters.

Other terms being considered by the review include "Islamist", "fundamentalist" and "jihad". The latter, for example, is often used by al Qaeda and some other groups to mean warfare against infidels, but for most Muslims indicates a spiritual struggle.
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guest author: Right Wing Conspirator in Discarded Lies - Hyperlinkopotamus:
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